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OKCupid wants you to rethink DTF to find your own F-word

Floss, fight about the president and farmer's market are all F-words the dating app hopes you substitute for the f-dash-dash-dash in DTF.

OkCupid wants you to forget what you know about the meaning of DTF. In its first-ever ad campaign, the dating app aims to redefine the acronym for “down to f—" and empower daters to find their own F-word.

The vibrant — and funny — campaign is kicking off in New York City’s subway starting Jan. 15 before rolling out in select U.S markets. The ads feature statements like “DTFight about the president,” "DTFour Twenty," “DTFoot the bill,” “DTFall head over heels” and “DTFarmer’s market,” all with the tagline “dating deserves better.”

In the world of online dating, the term "DTF" typically stands for "down to f--k." Dating app users sometimes message romantic prospects with "DTF?" to ask if they're interested in having sex. But not everyone on dating apps wants a casual hookup. 

“More than 10 years after OkCupid was founded, this campaign unashamedly reconfirms what we believe: that dating deserves better,” Chief Marketing Officer Melissa Hobley said. “We’re proud that OkCupid is one of the only dating apps that truly reflects back what is happening culturally, and we felt a responsibility — and opportunity — to play a part in changing the conversation about dating culture and empowering each individual to expand the meaning of DTF in a way that reflects what they want from dating.”

The ads were designed by Italian artists Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari, “two of the most interesting, talented, provocative artists around today,” Hobley said. “They are, of course, known for making a statement with their art, and so when we started talking about this mission of reclaiming 'DTF,' they had as much passion as the OkCupid team, and even more creativity. They were truly the perfect fit, and we're so excited with how they brought this mission and a conversation about dating to life.”

The campaign was developed by the Wieden+Kennedy New York advertising agency. 

 
 
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