Due to Rosh Hashanah and the 17th anniversary on 9/11 this week, the New York primary election was moved to Thursday from its normal Tuesday.
Due to Rosh Hashanah and the 17th anniversary on 9/11 this week, the New York primary election was moved to Thursday from its normal Tuesday. (iStock)

If you want to change — or keep — the political landscape of this city and state (and get that Instagrammable “I voted” sticker, too), you’ll get your next chance during the New York primary election on Thursday.

 

Yes, Thursday. Due to Rosh Hashanah and the 17th anniversary of 9/11 this week, the New York primary election was moved from its normal Tuesday.

 

Voters will choose their party’s nominees for this year’s general election on Nov. 6. Despite this importance, “voter participation in New York’s primary elections is historically low,” said Citizens Union Executive Director Betsy Gotbaum. “This year’s turnout will likely be even lower due to the date change. We need to make sure all New Yorkers who are registered to vote show up to vote.”

 

Adds Amy Loprest, executive director of the NYC Campaign Finance Board, “The decisions we make as voters can affect every part of our daily lives, from our schools to the subways to our voting rights. New Yorkers should not miss this opportunity to speak up.”

 

When can I vote in the New York primary election?

Polls open Thursday at 6 a.m. and close at 9 p.m. You can only vote at your designated polling station, which you can find by visiting vote.nyc.ny.us or looking on your voter registration card.

 

Who’s on the ballot for the New York primary election?

Incumbent Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo faces longtime actress and activist Cynthia Nixon in this year’s New York primary election. (Getty)

While Assembly, State Senate and judicial candidates are on the ballot of the 2018 New York primary election, eyes are on incumbent Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo and challenger Cynthia Nixon. Additionally, Democrats Leecia Eve, a Verizon executive and former Clinton administration aide; New York City Public Advocate Letitia James; Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney and law professor Zephyr Teachout are vying for attorney general.

On the Republican side, Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro and Manhattan lawyer Keith Wofford are running unopposed for governor and attorney general, respectively.