The city’s recently defunct speed camera program is slated to return as kids head back to school next week, officials announced.
Kids participate in a rally last month to protest the end of the city's speed cameras program. (Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)

A week before New York City kids head back to school, officials announced that the recently defunct speed cameras program is set to return.

“State Senate Republicans refused to renew New York City’s speed camera program, so Gov. Cuomo, City Council Speaker Cory Johnson and I will take action,” Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted Monday morning. “I will be signing a city law to take back control of our speed cameras and protect 1.1 million kids on the first day of school.”

The city’s speed camera program, which stemmed from a temporary 2013 law, expired July 25 and 120 cameras at 140 school zones across the five boroughs turned off despite much outrage from city officials, parents and others. The other 20 cameras were to remain operational until the end of this month.

 

Despite the speed camera program ending, the devices remained on, but no summonses were sent to speeding drivers.

“The minute they were gone we saw a vast amount more speeding,” the mayor said two weeks after the program ended.

Speed cameras to return with classes 

Kids participate in a rally last month to protest the end of the city's speed cameras program. (Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order to help the speed camera program restart without state legislation, The New York Times reported. Cuomo’s order enables the city to access driver data from the Department of Motor Vehicles to match with license plates on vehicles captured speeding on the school zone cameras.

Such access to those caught on the speed cameras will allow the city to issue $50 fines.

City Council will hold a special session to pass the law Wednesday, which the mayor will sign as schools reopen next week.

“Since the minute the cameras were turned off the City Council has been seeking a solution,” Johnson said Sunday. “I’m grateful we were able to work with the governor and the mayor to figure out a way to get the cameras turned on before school. We think this will protect kids’ lives.” 

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