The idea of Oprah Winfrey running for president deeply bothers Philly black nationalist Dr. Umar Johnson. (Getty Images/Provided)

Dr. Umar Johnson has been in the spotlight after being ordered to a state psychology board hearing over his licensing, but while that decision is pending Johnson is again causing a stir while on a lecture tour in Asia.

 

The fiery orator, educator and writer, who calls himself the "Prince of pan-Afrikanism," recently took to YouTube to slam the idea of Oprah Winfrey running for president.

 

"If they do put Oprah in, I believe it is to bring about the permanent demise of the black male," Johnson said in a video posted on YouTube Jan. 11 that had some 50,000 views. "An Oprah Winfrey presidency spells extermination for black men everywhere."

 

And why would she do that, exactly? It's not Oprah, Johnson says, but the "power structure" that he claims is using "LGBT-ism" and feminism against black males, things he has spoken about recently to his audience of hundreds of thousands on social media.

 

"If the power structure needs Oprah Winfrey's stature and status and fame and feminism and pro-multiculturalism and LGBTism in order to advance its global agenda," Johnson said in the video, "then Oprah Winfrey will very well be the next president of the US."

 

Winfrey garnered calls to run for president after her recent Golden Globes award acceptance speech. In addition to her massive popularity from decades in media and philanthropy, Winfrey is seen as advocating Democratic liberal ideas that are an antidote to the antics of President Donald Trump.

But Johnson seems to view social changes as concealed mechanisms of racist eugenic programs led by all-powerful conspiracies, not unlike The X-Files.

Ironically, while Johnson's career is dedicated to Afrocentric and pro-black causes, as in this case, some of his opinions mirror those of white supremacist conspiracy theorists, who make conspiratorial claims that are nearly identical.

Dr. Johnson is an educator and longtime school psychologist based in Philly who has been fundraising for a hypothetical dream school for black children since 2014. (He's advocated extreme rules for the school, such as expelling girls with "unnatural hair.")

He appeared at a state psychology board for a hearing earlier this month over whether he had the appropriate license, but afterward declared victory and maintained that he had never misrepresented himself as a licensed psychologist.

He is currently on tour in Asia, broadcasting from his Instagram account, which was recently reinstated.