Choose Your City
Change City

'Knuckleheads' needn't attend Super Bowl parade, says mayor

Obviously, Philadelphians know how to party. But Mayor Jim Kenney has a message for overzealous Eagles fans ahead of Thursday's big parade.
Philadelphia, Eagles fans
Fans celebrate in Center City after the Philadelphia Eagles defeated the New England Patriots to win the Super Bowl on February 4, 2018. Photo: Getty Images

The city of Philadelphia is rightfully getting excited to celebrate the Eagles epic Super Bowl victory over the New England Patriots at a parade Thursday, but the mayor wants debaucherous party animals to stay home. 

As details about Thursday's Eagles Super Bowl victory parade emerged Tuesday, Mayor Jim Kenney said the city was expecting a crowd that topped the 2008 Phillies parade. As with any massive public event, crowd control is a concern. 

"Knuckleheads should stay home," Kenney said of Thursday's parade, according to NBC Sports. Though it wasn't immediately clear what constituted a "knucklehead," it's fair to assume law enforcement will have their eyes open for any illegal or dangerous activity. 

After the Eagle's Super Bowl win Sunday, thousands of Eagles fans erupted with joy on the streets of Philadelphia. The mania led to some questionable acts, like one man who dropped to his knees at the urging of a crowd and stuck his face in a pile of horse feces, eating it. That incident was caught on video. 


A Ritz-Carlton awning collapsed after more than a dozen people climbed atop it, and several storefront windows were broken. That incident was also captured on camera.


These people was on top of the ritz Carlton 😳😳😳

A post shared by Syreeta D. Williams (@reeta_theblackbeauty) on

Kenney didn't hold back about Sunday's "knucklehead behavior" either, saying in a radio interview that multiple people were hurt after falling from light poles "like idiots."

Before the Super Bowl, as the Eagles made their way to the championship game, two Eagles fans punched police horses in separate incidents. 

Thursday's parade begins at 11 a.m. at Broad and Pattison in South Philadelphia then proceeds to the Art Museum for a ceremony on the steps next to the Rocky Statue at 1 p.m. A celebration there is expected to last about 90 minutes.