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SEPTA rates increase across the board

SEPTA board of trustees voted to pass rate hikes at their Thursday night meetings.
Charles Mostoller

The cost of every service SEPTA offers – from mass transit to parking – will increase this summer, after the transportation authority’s board voted on Thursday for what they called “modest increases across all modes of travel and methods of payment.”

This rate increase – which is planned to take effect on July 1 – was set to be implemented last year, but plans were put on hold as SEPTA rolled out its new SEPTA Key program.

Rates will increase as follows:

- Cash Fare/Quick Trip costs will increase from $2.25 to $2.50.

- Discounted single ride with SEPTA Key Travel Wallet/Token will got up to $2 from $1.80.

- Disabled Fare costs will raise from $1 to $1.25.

- Costs for a Paratransit or Shared Ride will raise from $4 to $4.25.

- The cost of a Weekly TransPass will increase from $24 to $25.50.

- The cost of a Monthly TransPass will increase to $96, up from $91 to $96.

- For a Weekly TrailPasses, which currently costs between $27.25 and $53, depending on zone, will increase to $28.25 to $55.75.

- Monthly TrailPasses, which currently cost between $101 and $191, depending on zone will increase to between $105 and $204.

- SEPTA’s Convenience Pass will cost more at $9, up from $8.

- The Independence Pass will go up as well, to cost $13 for an individual, up from $12 and $30 for a family, up from its current price of $29.

- Also, Ten Trip Discounted Fares for Regional Rail, which currently cost between $38 to 80, depending on zone, will increase to between $40 and $82.50. SEPTA also plans to replace these Ten-Trip Tickets with the implementation of the SEPTA Key.

- Finally, parking at SEPTA’s Regional Rail surface lots will cost more, with daily parking up to $1.25, from $1 and monthly permits up to $25 from $20.

In a statement announcing the fare hike, SEPTA notes that these rate increases are intended to help the transportation authority to afford “the everyday expenses of running the system, such as labor, fuel and power.”

For more specifics of the coming rate increase, further details can be found online here