The thought of yet another election for Nova Scotians is making some people cringe.

 

And Halifax MP Megan Leslie appears to be among this group.

 

Asked yesterday if too many elections are taking place, the rookie MP paused, and then answered “yes” before letting out an exhaustive laugh.

 

“I really thought this last provincial election voter turnout would go up, I thought people were really engaged with what was going on, and I was proven wrong,” the New Democrat said from Quebec. “Voter turnout was down and I think it’s because we have voter fatigue, we have election fatigue, we have promise fatigue, and it’s not the right time for one.”

Nova Scotians could be headed back to the polls for a ninth time in five years – and fourth in about 13 months – should a looming fall federal election come to fruition.

Election talk was amplified Tuesday when Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff announced he would no longer be supporting Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his minority Conservative government.

“We see the effect it has,” Leslie said. “People are tuning electoral politics out and that’s really dangerous because voting is so essential to our democracy."

Nova Scotia had record low participation in June’s provincial election.

But the good news for burnt-out voters is the province has a majority government for the first time since 2005, meaning another election in Nova Scotia is likely a few years off.

Federally, it’s a different story.

Jeff MacLeod, associate professor of political studies at Mount Saint Vincent University, said federal elections could happen even "more frequently" in the next decade than we've recently seen because of status-quo minority governments.

He added federal politicians “aren’t entirely blind” to the resistance some have to going back to the polls, but are also “guided by the pressure to hold the government to account and an election is a good way to do that.

“It will entirely be contingent on the enthusiasm and the effectiveness of the campaigns," he said of voter turnout in a possible fall election. “The last federal election was, quite frankly, a snoozer.”