Man denied bail in nuclear devices case

A Toronto man believed to be the only Canadian ever charged under the United Nations Act will remain in custody as he awaits trial for allegedly trying to send nuclear technology to Iran, a judge ruled yesterday.

A Toronto man believed to be the only Canadian ever charged under the United Nations Act will remain in custody as he awaits trial for allegedly trying to send nuclear technology to Iran, a judge ruled yesterday.

Mahmoud Yadegari, 35, was arrested last month after a joint eight-week investigation by the RCMP and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He spent the last two-and-a-half weeks in jail awaiting a decision on his application for bail.

“Mr. Yadegari is disappointed that he is not being reunited with his wife and young son,” his lawyer, Craig Penney, said in a written statement.

Authorities allege Yadegari tried to procure and export pressure transducers.

The devices, which are hand-sized, have a myriad of legitimate commercial uses, but can also be used in the production of enriched uranium for military purposes.

At a press conference following his arrest, police said Yadegari allegedly purchased 10 of the transducers from a Boston-area company for about $1,100 each. Police said the company alerted authorities after learning the transducers would be shipped to Yadegari in Toronto, and then on to Dubai in the United Arab Emirates before being sent to Iran.

 
 
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