In a live briefing Thursday night from the headquarters of the New York Police Department, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that a terror threat against New York City is credible but not corroborated.

 

NYPD announced Thursday they will be increasing security around New York City as U.S. Intelligence officials picked up information about a possible terror attack on or near the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

 

Janice Fedarcyk, head of the FBI's New York office declined to provide details of the threat, including its origin.

 

Bloomberg said that while the threat is being taken seriously, New Yorkers should go about their business and "refuse to be intimidated."

 

"I plan to be on the subway tomorrow morning," he said.

 

He did, however, urge the public to remember that if they "see something, say something" and report any suspicious packages or activities.

Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said he plans on increasing patrols and the towing of illegally parked cars. He said there will also be more bomb-sniffing dogs and increased security on bridges and tunnels, according to the Associated Press.

Kelly said that there will be increased bag checks on the subway as well as additional vehicle check points.

"As we know from intelligence gathered from the Osama bin Laden raid, Al Qaeda has shown an interest in important dates and anniversaries, such as 9/11," Department of Homeland Security spokesman Matt Chandler said in a statement. "In this instance, it's accurate that there is specific, credible but unconfirmed threat information."

Governor Andrew Cuomo released a statement Thursday stating that law enforcement agencies were in constant contact with federal and local agencies.

"All New Yorkers should be cautious and aware as we prepare to commemorate the 9/11 anniversary," he said. "However, there is no reason to panic or allow our spirit of freedom to dampened as we get ready to celebrate the opening of the Ground Zero site this weekend."

President Barack Obama and former President George W.Bush are set to attend the official 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero on Sunday, and security was already expected to be tight downtown.

“We have pulled together as a country, and I think one of the things we’ve learned is that if we can get rid of the partisanship and focus on working together, this country – and I think this City in particular – is able to do anything," Bloomberg concluded his speech.