Midwifery catching on in B.C.

<p>It’s been 10 years to the month since women in British Columbia first gained publicly funded access to midwifery care.</p>

 

Public funding allowing practice to flourish

 

Photo courtesy of Melanie Andrushko

 

Melanie Andrushko, 31, with her seven-week-old daughter, Mila. Andrushko gave birth with the help of a midwife because she wanted a more personal experience than delivery with a doctor.

 




It’s been 10 years to the month since women in British Columbia first gained publicly funded access to midwifery care.



Melanie Andrushko, 31, gave birth to daughter Mila nearly eight weeks ago with the help of a midwife.



She said it was more personal than using a doctor.



"Being our first baby we didn’t really know what to expect or what to ask," said Andrushko.



"I wanted to be at home as long as I could (before going to hospital), and knowing I could just call the midwife and she’d come and be with us was (important)."



Lisa Sutherland, co-owner of Bloom Community Midwives in Vancouver, said there are about 25 new midwives in the province every year, a significant jump from 10 years ago.



"(Clients) like that we involve them in decision-making," said Sutherland, 30.



"They like that they know who’s going to be at their birth and that we come to their home for the first few weeks to help them adjust to having a baby in their home."




















access to care




  • Clients of midwives have access to the same medications and services as other women, and can choose to give birth in hospital.


 
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