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Miller’s race is run

David Miller is loping along the Toronto shoreline in shorts and asinglet, passing the pavilion at Sunnyside as he heads east toward thecity’s downtown, and talking about his decision not to run forre-election in 2010.

David Miller is loping along the Toronto shoreline in shorts and a singlet, passing the pavilion at Sunnyside as he heads east toward the city’s downtown, and talking about his decision not to run for re-election in 2010.

“I do feel freer,” says Miller. “It’s about having announced the decision. When you’ve made a significant decision like that, whatever it is, until you go through with it, it weighs on you.

“It does feel much lighter. My whole body feels lighter.”

And that’s a good thing when you’re 50 years old and running your first half-marathon — 13.1 miles or 21 kilometres — along Toronto’s waterfront.

Miller is in an unaccustomed position — decidedly in the middle of the pack, just one in a stream in a stream of heaving shoulders and striding legs, running shoes, shorts and ball-caps.
It’s not in David Miller’s nature to enter a race that he knows he can’t win.

Deputy Premier George Smitherman ran the five-kilometre route, arriving near old city hall feeling “fantastic.”

He ran the full marathon three years ago. “Coming up Bay Street today and feeling five-kilometre legs under me — not marathon legs — was particularly great,” he said.

Asked whether he plans to run for mayor of Toronto in next year’s election, Smitherman he’s been “very clear” that it’s a decision for 2010.

“That’s next year’s race,” he said.

While Miller and Smitherman were busy running, Toronto Coun. Georgio Mammoliti was sending a strong signal that he intends to be part of next year’s mayoral race.

 
 
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