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More couples mix it up

It looks like Russell Peters might be right — sooner or later, everyone’s going to be beige. <br />More Canadians are in mixed-race marriages than ever before, accordingto the 2006 census figures released yesterday by Statistics Canada’


It looks like Russell Peters might be right — sooner or later, everyone’s going to be beige.
More Canadians are in mixed-race marriages than ever before, according to the 2006 census figures released yesterday by Statistics Canada’
“The whole world’s mixing,” the Indo-Canadian comedian who is hosting the Juno Awards on Sunday, says in one of his stand-up routines.
“Nothing you can do about it,” Peters says. “So you can run from us now (but) sooner or later we’re going to hump you.”
Nationwide there are nearly 290,000 mixed-race married and common law couples, one third more than in 2001. Jermaine Kwok, 35, has been married to her husband, who is Caucasian, for 10 years, and said the numbers don’t surprise her.
“I’m not the only one in my family (in a mixed-race relationship) and I’m not the only of my friends,” she said.
Kwok said her marriage to a non-Chinese man was no surprise to parents, who chose to raise their children in multicultural Coquitlam.
“My family is not hard-core traditionalists.”
Christine Hogg, 35, who is Hindi, has been married to her Caucasian husband for a decade.
She, too, said their marriage didn’t raise any eyebrows in her family.
“He fits in,” she said, adding that whenever they attend traditional ceremonies or events, her husband gets coached on etiquette ahead of time.

kristen.thompson@metronews.ca


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