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No resolve for resolutions

<p>That’s right, it’s once again time to reflect on the past misgivings and forge ahead with the annual list of new year’s resolutions.</p>

Setting your goals too high may lead to failure


"It’s (new year’s resolutions) kind of like dieting — you make one mistake and then instead of stopping after one cookie you have a whole gallon of ice cream to go with it because you feel bad about messing up."






That’s right, it’s once again time to reflect on the past misgivings and forge ahead with the annual list of new year’s resolutions.





Or is it?





Tammy Mierau said she doesn’t bother making new year’s resolutions any more – she’s tired of not sticking with them.





So what’s the problem?





“You set yourself to a specific time, and you don’t make that time, and you just give up,” said the 40-year-old Calgarian, relaxing with her Starbucks coffee at the Southland Drive and Macleod Trail Chapters.





Mierau said the gym is loaded to capacity in early January, but come March she figures those numbers thin out considerably.





“You might as well start your new year’s resolution in June — because the gym sure would be a lot less crowded.”





Mierau might be on to something. Even though studies indicate we place a high personal importance on new year’s resolutions, 22 per cent of people fail to continue with their goal within the first week and nearly half of adults packed things in by the three-month mark, according to a paper published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology.





Twenty-five-year-old Marc Forest-Smith has had success with past personal pledges by making them attainable.





“I think I’ve always made resolutions that have been easy for me to do,” said the former Calgarian, now living in Vancouver, who is back for the holidays.





“Something like, “I’ve been playing guitar more, so now I am just going to play guitar even … more.”





Recent nursing graduate, Heather Smuda, 25, doesn’t figure it’s as easy as that, noting that she thinks people would have more success if they wrote the goals down and had a support system to help reach them.





“It’s kind of like dieting — you make one mistake and then instead of stopping after one cookie you have a whole gallon of ice cream to go with it because you feel bad about messing up,” she said. “I think people mess up once and they don’t keep trying.”





Experts say if you want to stick with your resolution you have to: maintain self-control, focus on a specific goal and always monitor the progress towards that goal.




darren.krause@metronews.ca

 
 
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