Obama writes on Employment Non-Discrimination Act for Huffington Post

President Obama urged Congress to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in a blog post for the Huffington Post.

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks on the government funding impasse at M. Luis Construction, a local small business in Rockville, Maryland, near Washington, October 3, 2013. REUTERS/Jason U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks on the government funding impasse at M. Luis Construction, a local small business in Rockville, Maryland, near Washington, October 3, 2013. REUTERS/Jason
President Barack Obama isn't just the head of state - he's a blogger, too. The president wrote a blog post for the Huffington Post - his third for the website - late last night urging Congress to pass Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would protect members of the LGBT community from discrimination in the workplace.

 

The president pointed out that though current laws protect employees based on their skin color, religion or disabilities, there are no such laws in place for sexual orientation. "In many states a person can be fired simply for being lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender," he wrote.

 

The president wrote of the current situation, "It's offensive. It's wrong. And it needs to stop, because in the United States of America, who you are and who you love should never be a fireable offense."

 

Obama also wrote of the United States' recent progress toward equality for the LGBT community: "Passing ENDA would build on the progress we've made in recent years. We stood up against hate crimes with the Matthew Shepard Act and lifted the entry ban for travelers with HIV. We ended "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" so our brave servicemen and women can serve openly the country they love, no matter who they love. We prohibited discrimination in housing and hospitals that receive federal funding, and we passed the Violence Against Women Act, which includes protections for LGBT Americans."

 

The president seemed confident that the act will pass. He wrote, "When Congress passes it, I will sign it into law, and our nation will be fairer and stronger for generations to come."

The act is up for vote today in the Senate and is expected to pass: 55 Democrats and five Republicans have said they will support the bill, which means the bill will have the 60 votes it needs to bypass a filibuster. House passage is less certain.

 
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