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Old electronics get a new life

<p>Computers collecting dust, clunky cellphones and old tube TV sets will no longer be cluttering up Edmonton’s city dump.Instead, a new $10-million recycling waste facility at the city landfill will churn, crush and strip those unwanted electronics down to valuable raw materials.</p>




Ben Lemphers/for metro edmonton


Alfred Hambsch, president of Global Electric Electronic Processing, explains the processing steps in recycling electronics to Mayor Stephen Mandel yesterday.



Computers collecting dust, clunky cellphones and old tube TV sets will no longer be cluttering up Edmonton’s city dump.



Instead, a new $10-million recycling waste facility at the city landfill will churn, crush and strip those unwanted electronics down to valuable raw materials.



The city’s new Waste Management Centre, one of Canada’s largest electric and electronic waste recycling facilities, is expected to process 30,000 tonnes of old electronics per year and its processes and equipment are considered by some to be cutting edge in waste recycling.



Alfred Hambsch, president of the company that built the plant, says it will serve as a hub for Western Canada and it’s capable of recycling all unwanted electronics in Alberta.



"The investment is tremendous and this will put everything back into commodities that we use every day," said Hambsch with Global Electric and Electronic Processing.



Raw materials from the plant, such as copper, aluminum and plastic, will be sold to other companies for reuse.




jeff.cummings@metronews.ca


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