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Parking inequities get blood boiling

Phyllis Broder, 76, is furious that her 20-second sprint to a librarydrop-off box got her a $250 ticket while a courier company would beatthe rap.

Phyllis Broder, 76, is furious that her 20-second sprint to a library drop-off box got her a $250 ticket while a courier company would beat the rap.

Velma Varey is spitting mad that a select group of Scarborough residents can park for free on their streets overnight while others across the city have to pay for permits.

John Weingust is outraged people can plead guilty to a ticket by mail or online but, to give notice they’ll fight, are forced to take time off to appear in person.

And wait until motorists hear about the 12-year-old “pilot project” that gives some of Toronto’s richest residents, at no extra cost, special transferable on-street parking permits that they can lend to house guests and tradespeople.

Rather than appease fed-up drivers, the release last week of Toronto’s secret handbook of excuses to beat parking tickets, and a more user-friendly version, has poked a hornet’s nest of discontent about inequities in the system that issued 2.8 million tickets last year.

Broder is one of more than two dozen people to call or email the Toronto Star with complaints about rules and enforcement after councillors Howard Moscoe and Denzil Minnan-Wong successfully fought city bureaucrats to get the guidelines released.

The handbook tells city staff they can cut some slack, on certain tickets in certain circumstances, to senior citizens, out-of-towners, delivery and fast-food companies, worshippers with a letter from their “Minister/Pastor/Holy Man,” the infirm, city councillors on official business, and others.