Computer error changed Jared Kushner voter registration to female

He's been playing "Bosom Buddies" at the ballot box for eight years. Why and how is unclear.
Published : September 27, 2017 Updated : September 29, 2017
Jared Kushner 2016 Election
Left to right: John Kelly, Jared Kushner and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Photo: Getty Images

Update 1:22 p.m. September 29, 2017 — It looks like Kushner is off the hook on this one. The presidential son-in-law was, in fact, listed as a woman in the New York Board of Elections database. But the New York Daily News reports that he registered as a male, and a computer error changed that to female. His record was corrected on Wednesday.

Original Story September 27, 2017 — In perhaps the strangest example of hypocrisy to come out of the Trump administration yet, presidential son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner is registered to vote in New York as a female.

Kushner — who has previously had trouble accurately filling out the disclosure forms for his security clearance — is listed on the New York State Board of Elections roster as "female."

The revelation comes in the same week that it was found that six members of Trump's circle used private email accounts to conduct government business, even though Trump made Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server a predominant issue in the campaign.

It also follows Trump's demonstrable lie that widespread voter fraud resulted in his losing the popular vote, after which it was found that former advisers Paul Manafort and Steve Bannon, former press secretary Sean Spicer, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, youngest daughter Tiffany Trump and Kushner were registered to vote in multiple states. But a member of Trump's circle goofing on the fairly basic reporting of their sex is a new one.

The Independent points out that Kushner has been playing "Bosom Buddies" at the ballot box for eight years.

Experts say that although it's a curious mistake, it's more ironic than actual voter fraud: "There has to be an intent to give the false information," Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt told Wired. "If he (for some reason) knowingly registered as a woman — for what purpose, I could not guess — that might be described as voter fraud, though it would have negligible effect on the determination of his eligibility, so wouldn’t amount to much anyway.”
 

 
Latest From ...
Most Popular From ...