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Kellyanne Conway's husband is going on an anti-Trump Twitter spree

George Conway previously withdrew from consideration for top jobs in the Trump administration.
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Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The husband of presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway has gone on a full-blast Twitter offensive — against his wife's boss, President Trump.

George Conway has sent nearly 100 tweets critical of Trump in the last month. He has only tweeted about 500 times in the six-year history of his account, with zero posts in 2015, nothing in 2016, and only 31 tweets in 2017, HuffPost noted.

But starting in February of this year, something shifted. Conway retweeted conservative commentator Mona Charon, who blasted Trump from the stage of the Conservative Political Action Conference and was escorted from the premises.

kellyanne conway husband george

Anti-Trump retweets from Kellyanne Conway husband, George

This month, Conway has sent or retweeted 200 tweets critical of President Trump, including:

• A retweet from a Washington Post writer saying Trump was "struggling mightily to find top-flight lawyers, as attorneys and firms seek to avoid a difficult client;"

• New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman commenting about "the hard reality for Trump — a wealthy man and president of the United States — is that almost no major law firm wants to work for him;"

• A retweet about two of the stock market's largest one-day drops coming in 2018;

• Retweets of reporters voicing skepticism over Trump's threat to veto the bipartisan spending bill (which he ultimately signed after darkly complaining about it in a hastily arranged press conference).

For her part, Kellyanne Conway's latest tweets involved the opioid epidemic and Trump taking his "toughest actions yet on Russia."

In February 2017, Conway was a candidate to be U.S. solicitor general but pulled himself out of contention. Last summer, he was up for a top post at the Department of Justice but similarly withdrew, citing a desire to stay in the private sector. He is currently a partner at D.C. firm Wachtell Lipton — one of those top-flight practices mentioned above — where profits per partner reportedly average around $6 million a year.