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Did Malia Obama actually claim white people will be 'blended out' by the time she's 30?

A meme says the former first daughter was suspended from Harvard for writing a paper on it.
sasha obama, natasha obama, barack obama
Sasha and Malia Obama. (Photo: Barack Obama White House)

According to a new meme, Malia Obama, the former first daughter and current college student, said that white people will be "blended out" of society in the next decade. But is it true or fake?

Superimposed on a photo of Malia, the quote goes: "White people are so 1960’s. Sometimes the only thing that keeps me going is the fact that they will be blended out by the time I am 30. Imagine a world without white people."

Did Malia Obama actually say this? No. It is fake. Did not happen. And there's no evidence she said anything remotely close to it, although the story has shown signs of growing additional false legs.

Snopes says that on April 6, the original meme was posted to the Facebook page of a group called America's Last Line of Defense, which is run by Christopher Blair, one of the biggest purveyors of online fake news. The page is described as satire on its own About page: "Nothing on this page is real. It is a collection of the satirical whimsies of liberal trolls masquerading as conservatives. You have been warned."

The Malia Obama fake news spreads

Politifact reports that on April 9, a pro-Trump site called Only Politics reported that Obama had been suspended from Harvard for writing a paper along those same lines. "Malia Obama suspended after racist anti-white attack goes viral," went the site's headline. That story is equally untrue. The piece quoted a dean at Harvard named Cain Markholder as saying, "This sort of attack against any race is uncalled for. Ms. Obama has been informed she is suspended pending an investigation into her statement." There is no dean at Harvard by that name.

For what it's worth, Politifact points out that the U.S Census reports the white race will grow from 248 million in 2016 to 263 million in 2030.