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<p>Strapped for time, but still interested in pursuing a career in radio and television? Ryerson University now has three certificate programs designed to give a general education in media arts, without having to commit to a four-year program.<br /></p>

Ryerson offers radio, television courses



Students who enrol in Ryerson University’s new TV Fundamentals certificate program have access to the High Definition TV studio.





Strapped for time, but still interested in pursuing a career in radio and television? Ryerson University now has three certificate programs designed to give a general education in media arts, without having to commit to a four-year program.


“There are six to eight courses in each certificate. Each course takes a semester, so as (students) come on board they have the opportunity to take courses as they are available, which means they can take them in stages so they can still work full time,” explains Dana Lee, a professor at Ryerson’s School of Radio and Television Arts.


The three certificates available to students are Radio Fundamentals, Television Fundamentals and Media Writing Fundamentals. Each one is geared towards a general overview of the chosen stream.


Students who sign up for Television Fundamentals have the added bonus of learning in Canada’s only educational High Definition TV studio. The studio includes three 1080i HD cameras, a control room and an audio mixing room.


“Most major productions at this point are doing High Definition production. So there is demand for having people who are trained in HD.”


There is also an intensive ten week program available for the television stream. The intensive program, which gives students the opportunity to take all six courses at the same time, is expected to run from April 23 to June 29 provided there is sufficient interest.


To register, applicants are required to attend an interview and submit an essay. A high school diploma is also necessary.


Lee says the majority of interest in the certificate programs is generated by two groups of students.


“It’s the professional people upgrading so they could be more flexible in their workplace. Or it’s the other group who said, ‘I’m working in a completely different part of the world right now. I’ve always wanted to learn about this television thing.’”


Kruchev Smith, a 35 year-old immigrant from Jamaica who is looking to break into the television and radio industry, completed a course in the Media Writing certificate program — the first of the three certificate programs to launch last fall.


“I found everyone very accommodating, I would definitely recommend it,” Smith says.


Registration for the 10-week intensive program starts March 12. For more information visit www.ryerson.ca/ce


 
 
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