Project seeks to keep young workers in area

Nova Scotia is hemorrhaging young, talented workers and the province needs to act fast before it is bled dry.

Nova Scotia is hemorrhaging young, talented workers and the province needs to act fast before it is bled dry.

That
was the dire warning issued by the Greater Halifax Partnership Friday
as it unveiled a new initiative promising to make it easier for young
people to find, and keep, jobs in the HRM.

At the centre of the
project, dubbed the Y2E Framework, is a website designed to act as a
“one-stop-shop” where young people will be able to register and access
a wealth of information on potential employers and youth organizations
that can help them connect with the right opportunities.

“It’s
not just going online and surfing for a career (in a job bank),”
explained project co-ordinator Krista Hall. “A young person could
potentially connect to an actual employer in Halifax who has said
they’re going to offer an apprenticeship, and mentor them.”

Still
in its infancy, the Y2E project will need the co-operation and
financial support of local businesses and youth organizations to get
off the ground, said Hall. Several of those stakeholders were on hand
for the project’s launch Friday.

“The demographic shortage is
the single biggest issue facing us right now,” GHP president Paul Kent
told the crowd, which included representatives from local construction
firms, auto body shops and hotels.

Tim Olive, executive
director of the Downtown Dartmouth Business Commission, also in the
audience, called the project a “tremendous” opportunity.

Time frame

Co-ordinator
Krista Hall said the website could be up and running within a year, and
will start by focusing on at-risk youth in HRM. Eventually Y2E could
evolve to help every young person in the province.

 
 
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