Some Vancouver restaurateurs will have an easier time adjusting to the province’s upcoming ban on trans fats as they have already eliminated it from their menus.

Peter Koraneluk, sous chef at the Sandbar on Granville Island, said yesterday that he’s been cooking without trans fats for nine months.

The menu won’t change, Koraneluk said, but he expects to change the way he advertises his food to mention the restaurant uses healthier alternatives.

On Saturday, Minister of Healthy Living and Sport Mary Polak announced that by Sept. 30 trans fats will be banned in all prepared and served foods in B.C.

Trans fats are found in fatty cuts of meat, most fast food and “junk food” items. They’re also in full-fat dairy products like cheese, butter and cream, processed foods containing hydrogenated fat and hard margarines. Trans fats have been linked to heart disease and high cholesterol.

The Canadian Restaurant Food Association (CRFA) immediately called the move “flawed.”

Mar von Schellwitz, CRFA vice-president for Western Canada, said the regulations will force B.C.

restaurant operators to limit trans fat on their menus, but have no control over the supply of trans-fat-free products.

“We urge the B.C. government to join the call for national regulations.”

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