Public on alert as US Ebola patients arrive in Atlanta

It is the first time anyone infected with the deadly virus, which has a 90 percent mortality rate, has been brought into the country.

This scanning electron micrograph, SEM, depicts a number of Ebola virions. Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola HF, is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates, monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees, that has appeared sporadically since its in This scanning electron micrograph, SEM, depicts a number of Ebola virions. Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola HF, is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates, monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees, that has appeared sporadically since its in

 

A US doctor infected with Ebola was being brought to Atlanta for treatment Saturday, the Associated Press reported.

 

 

It is the first time anyone infected with the deadly virus, which has a 90 percent mortality rate, has been brought into the country.

 

The response on social media showed a strong surge of concern throughout the public.

"It's not a game. Y'all realize there is no cure for #ebola right? Most people die. A painful death with all their organs bleeding out," wrote @MissEzinne.

"I do NOT support #Ebola coming to the US, but I would support a Marine in Mexico returning home," wrote Twitter user @KonservativeKim.

User @HollyRFisher wrote, "#Ebola patient en route to Emory University...if I was anywhere near #Emory I'd be peacing out."

Samaritan's Purse missionary group told the AP the the US Ebola patient is Dr. Kent Brantly, who reportedlyworked at a hospital in Liberia that treats Ebola patients.

Brantly and an American aid worker, Nancy Writebol, will be treated at a special isolation unit at Emory University Hospital, according to the report. Writebol is expected to arrive in the US within a few days, according to a USA Today report.

The hospital is near the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention headquarters.

A private jet is being used that is outfitted with a special, portable tent designed to transport patients with highly infectious diseases, the AP reported.

Doctors at Emory have said they are confident they can treat the pair without posing a risk to the public.

“The reason we are bringing these patients back to our facility is because we feel they deserve to have the highest level of care offered for their treatment,” Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. Bruce S. Ribner said at a Friday news conference.

Doctors at Emory plan to support the Ebola patients' vital functions, like breathing and blood pressure.

“We depend on the body’s defenses to control the virus,” said Ribner. “We just have to keep the patient alive long enough in order for the body to control this infection.”

In order to contract the disease, one must come in contact with an infected person's bodily fluid.

Hospitals across the nation have been training clinical staff to be on the lookout for symptoms of Ebola.

Follow Morgan Rousseau on Twitter: @MetroMorgan
Follow Metro Boston on Twitter: @MetroBOS

 
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