RCMP probes police shooting

<p>A man who was inside a stolen Ford pick-up truck is in serious condition in hospital today after an Edmonton patrol officer shot him in the chest during a routine traffic stop.</p>

 

Man in hospital after patrol officer opens fire on pick-up truck


 


« It’s concerning when you shoot someone who is inside a vehicle in the middle of the night. ... When it’s dark — firing a gun is risky — you’re putting people at risk that may not be a part of the action. »

 

 


A man who was inside a stolen Ford pick-up truck is in serious condition in hospital today after an Edmonton patrol officer shot him in the chest during a routine traffic stop.



Police say two officers stopped the truck around 12:45 a.m. yesterday on Anthony Henday Drive, south of Yellowhead Trail, and one of the officers fired his gun when the truck suddenly drove towards them.



The truck was eventually stopped near 174 Ave. and 97 St. where three people were taken into police custody while a fourth man inside was found suffering from a gunshot wound and was rushed to hospital.



Police won’t say if the injured man was the driver or another passenger, but police Chief Mike Boyd was notified of the incident and immediately authorized the RCMP to lead an investigation.



"In the interest of transparency and accountability, that investigation is being led by the RCMP," said police spokesman Jeff Wuite.



The Anthony Henday was closed for most of the day yesterday and Mounties involved with the case say the RCMP’s Serious Crimes Unit will review the police shooting.



"They will investigate all aspects of the incident, including circumstances that resulted in one of the vehicle occupants suffering from the gunshot wound," said RCMP Cpl. Wayne Oakes.



He added that once the investigation is complete, the file will then be forwarded to Alberta Justice for a review.



Officials with Criminal Trial Lawyers’ Association said they will be watching this latest Edmonton police shooting with a close eye.



"It’s concerning when you shoot someone who is inside a vehicle in the middle of the night," said Tom Engel, chair of the association.



"You don’t even know if there were other people in there other than the driver. When it’s dark — firing a gun is risky — you’re putting people at risk that may not be a part of the action."




jeff.cummings@metronews.ca



Jeff Cummings/Metro Edmonton

 
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