Reviews from New York Fashion Week (PHOTOS)

 

 

 

1. Suno

Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty’s trademark prints got bigger, bolder and less overtly ethnic this season. The globe-trotting element they’re known for was missing, replaced instead with a kind of art world whimsy. Some of the most intriguing looks were surprisingly the least Suno-esque, such as a nude intarsia mock-neck sweater layered over a silk halter top and matching ruffled skirt, as well as a simple, oversized fisherman sweater paired with a black leather pencil skirt. The duo is clearly trying to figure out how to evolve from its African wax-print foundation. It will be interesting to see where they end up. Kenya Hunt

 



2. Helmut Lang

In a lot of ways, Michael and Nicole Colovos’ autumn collection mirrored the audience — that slick, minimalist, all-black fashion editor’s look complete with sharply tailored jackets and trousers. Frankly, there will always be a market for a well-made moto jacket, but it doesn’t necessarily make for the most exciting runway show. Things got more interesting when they worked in color, such as an oxblood trouser suit (bur­gundy is big this season) and a variety of graphic-printed dresses. Kenya Hunt



3. Richard Chai Love

The girls dressed like boys in masculine coats and laid-back trousers in Chai’s joint men’s and women’s wear show. And the guys wore voluminous parkas cinched at the waist — a shape-defining trick the ladies know well. The rest of the collection, however, was all masculine. Perhaps it has something to do with Chai’s recent appointment as creative director of Filson, the rugged outdoor clothing brand. The end result: practical separates in mostly gloomy charcoals, blacks and navy, with a smattering of floral chiffon pants and a slew of handsome outerwear. The oversized utility pockets found on some of the looks, however, should be left for hunting trips rather than the urban jungle. Tina Chadha





4. Cushnie et Ochs

Though Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs started out their fall show with some body-con stunners (the dresses with cut-outs showcasing the decolletage were both provocative and elegant), there were some issues. Namely, we can’t see anyone bigger than a B cup gracefully fitting into these numbers. And second, the pencil skirts with the dangerously high slits in the back straddle the line between dark and sexy and just plain hoochie. The duos use of zipper embellishments was a fun update to their edgy aesthetic. Tina Chadha



5. Rag & Bone

As temperatures in New York dropped down to glacial lows, Marcus Wainwright and David Neville’s dense layering didn’t seem like such a bad idea. Who wouldn’t want a chic and cozy blanket coat to toss over a trouser suit like the strong opening look? The only problem is that heavy layering — especially when it involves elements like, say, a printed wrap dress over a knit turtleneck and trousers — can only go so far before it starts to add awkward lumps. That said, look for their perfectly cool separates and coats in stores, but maybe think hard before imitating the runway styling. Kenya Hunt





6. Costello Tagliapietra

Jeffrey Costello and Robert Tagliapietra have established a method that has worked well for them: soft, feminine, vaguely retro dresses that look great no matter what the trend of the moment. Still, one can’t help sometimes wishing for a bit more from the popular duo — a bigger dose of the unexpected to shock the senses. The digital prints they turned out came pretty close, adding a jolt of the future to their always pretty, vintage-flavored draped jersey dresses. Kenya Hunt

 
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