Rough enough for pink

<p>Are lacrosse players tough enough to wear pink? The resounding yes from the Calgary Roughnecks lacrosse team is evident as they will open the season in unique pink jerseys in support of breast cancer research.</p>

 

City lacrosse team to don special jerseys for breast cancer research


 

 

robin kuniski/for metro calgary

 

Calgary Roughnecks assistant captain Kaleb Toth with Tamara Collins, spokeswoman for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, unveil the Roughnecks’ special pink team jersey in support of breast cancer research yesterday at Spolumbo’s in the city’s southeast.





Are lacrosse players tough enough to wear pink?





The resounding yes from the Calgary Roughnecks lacrosse team is evident as they will open the season in unique pink jerseys in support of breast cancer research.





Kaleb Toth, assistant captain of the 2008 Riggers team, donned the special jersey during its premier yesterday at Spolumbos on 9th Ave. SE, and said it’s a fun way for the team to give back to the community.





“Anytime you can give back to the community and the fans and help out a good cause it’s special. And we get to wear pink jerseys,” he said, joking, “I was a bit worried before I put it on but it actually looks good!”





But for Toth and a couple of teammates, the pink jerseys represent something more — they have had family affected by breast cancer.





“My grandma had breast cancer and had to remove one of her breasts because of it but she is still around thankfully. But breast cancer is something that affects everyone in one way or another,” said the Roughneck veteran.





The team will be wearing the special jerseys during their home opener on Jan. 12 against the San Jose Stealth as a partnership with the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (CBCF).





After the game they will be putting the worn jerseys up for fans to bid on in an auction with proceeds going to cancer research, according to CBCF spokeswoman Tamara Collins.





“We were really excited when the Roughnecks came to us with this opportunity. We loved the idea and it will not only raise funds towards finding a cure for cancer but it will raise awareness, too,” she said.





Collins said it is a common misconception that men think they cannot get breast cancer.





“In the next year 160 men will be affected with breast cancer. That is far less than the 22,000 women it will affect but it’s still significant. It’s a good thing the team is brining awareness to the issue.”





A portion of the 50/50 sales will also go towards breast cancer research.




krista.sylvester@metronews.ca














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