Home
 
Choose Your City
Change City

Runways fall short

<p>Runways at Canadian airports are falling short of international standards, and Ottawa needs to mandate extended safety zones to prevent crashes like the one that sent an Air France jet hurtling into a ravine in stormy weather, a report said yesterday.</p>

Crash probe eyed safety issues



Adrian Wyld/cp


Investigators review the remains of the Air France plane which crashed on landing, at Pearson airport in Toronto Wednesday Aug. 3, 2005.





Runways at Canadian airports are falling short of international standards, and Ottawa needs to mandate extended safety zones to prevent crashes like the one that sent an Air France jet hurtling into a ravine in stormy weather, a report said yesterday.



The Transportation Safety Board did not blame the pilot and his crew in its final report on what caused Flight 358 to skid off a runway at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport on Aug. 2, 2005, during torrential rain.



Rather, the report targeted the "systemic" failures behind the crash, noting 10 more aircraft have crashed globally in similar circumstances since then. It made seven recommendations to both Transport Canada and the world’s regulatory bodies on preventing future accidents.



Chief among the measures intended to minimize injuries after a crash was a recommendation to force Canadian airports to bring runway safety zones up to international standards.



















standards




  • One recommendation was that clear standards limiting approaches and landings in bad weather at Canadian airports should be set.


 
 
You Might Also Like