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Saving on a tight budget

<p>I started working several months ago for an investment firm. Part of my job should involve assisting the lead analyst with his work. Instead I’m just doing minor chores as he wants to do it all by himself. How do I deal with this?</p>

Student frets over how to pay her mound of bills



Q: I started working several months ago for an investment firm. Part of my job should involve assisting the lead analyst with his work. Instead I’m just doing minor chores as he wants to do it all by himself. How do I deal with this?







A:
You definitely need to have a meeting with your lead analyst to discuss your frustration with not getting the opportunities to hone your skills. It will only take him longer to complete his tasks since he’s not taking advantage of your assistance, and in business, time is money! Even if he starts small, working you up from minor to larger assignments, he should acknowledge that giving you meaningful tasks is part of his job requirements.





If there are still no improvements after your candid but respectful conversation with him, your next step is talking to whoever is above him.





Staying quiet is not an option because, in this case, your silence might cost you future promotions or job opportunities.







Q:
Jill, I got canned a while ago so I decided to go back to college on a loan. While I’ve been working small gigs here and there I just haven’t been able to keep up with personal savings as I once did. How do you save when bills keep piling up?






A: It’s tough — how do you save when you are both a student and can barely pay the bills? We must rethink our concept of saving during this time. It might not be hundreds a month, but what about those few dollars you’d regularly spend on fast food or entertainment? Rent a movie instead of paying those hefty theatre prices. Cut down on your daytime minutes on your cellphone. Visit your bank to get one-on-one support. It’s tough, but making all payments on time — even if it’s the minimum payments — is crucial to maintaining good credit.





Start small because trying to save too much when basic necessities aren’t met will only overwhelm you.





Good luck!


















jill’s tip of the week





In Rich By Thirty: A Young Adult’s Guide To Financial Success (Key Porter Books, 2007), Lesley Scorgie, a 23-year-old University of Alberta marketing and finance graduate, shares secrets on how to save, invest and budget wisely, regardless of what financial stage you are at in your life.





Scorgie owns her own home and first appeared on The Oprah Winfrey show at 17. www.richbythirty.com






info@jillandrewmedia.com





Jill Andrew CYW, BA (Hons.), BEd, MA ‘08 is an award-winning journalist and educator with additional expertise in the performing arts, public speaking, PR, media literacy/awareness, fundraising and entrepreneurship. www.jillandrewmedia.com, or www.curvycatwalk.com.

 
 
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