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Science and technology phenoms stretch their research muscles

<p>If Abisola Ojikutu has her way, some day soon analyzing red blood cells for patient use will be easier and faster, thanks to the research completed by the 16-year-old science whiz.</p>




Ojikutu





If Abisola Ojikutu has her way, some day soon analyzing red blood cells for patient use will be easier and faster, thanks to the research completed by the 16-year-old science whiz.





The Edmonton student presented her research at the Women in Scholarship, Engineering, Science and Technology (WISEST) summer research program conclusion yesterday.





The program, hosted at the University of Alberta in partnership with academics, industry members and corporate sponsors, provides female high school students the opportunity to explore their interests in science and technology.





Ojikutu admits she knew nothing about blood analysis research before starting her summer program with WISEST, which matched her with a research project and partner, in this case the Canadian Blood Services.





“I’ve always been really interested in science and wanted to see exactly what true research is all about,” she said. “After I was given the project I worked in the lab for six weeks at Canadian Blood Services.”


 
 
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