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Shrink Wrap: When is love worth the wait?

Elisha Cuthbert isproving that sometimes people do live happily ever after.

Elisha Cuthbert, one of the stars of the ABC series "Happy Endings," is proving that sometimes people do live happily ever after. It was recently announced that she and longtime boyfriend Dion Phaneuf, the Toronto Maple Leafs NHL hockey player, are engaged to be married after dating for four years. For some, that could seem like an eternity to wait. It raises the question, how much time do you give a relationship before getting a proposal? And how long is too long?

There are many things that can keep one or both members of a couple from taking that big leap toward marriage. Sometimes these issues are never resolved, or worse, they are just excuses. Other times they really are honest concerns that just need time to work themselves out. So how can you know the difference?

The most important thing to keep in mind is that despite the fact that your partner's reluctance to commit can feel like a rejection of you, try not to take it personally. You can do this by recognizing that very often when one partner is holding back on taking that huge step, it often has more to do with their own individual issues and fears than with how they feel about the other person. They might be worried about career success, or making enough money to support a family, or maybe they were betrayed before and have trust issues. If someone has already been married, there might be all sorts of concerns keeping them from trying again.

Talk to your partner about why they are not ready to go forward. See if you can jointly determine what it might take for them to get beyond their fears. Set goals to work toward making those changes. And then you can set a time limit for yourself, maybe six months or a year, and see if anything is being done. As long as your partner is trying, then your relationship is still viable and worth fighting for. But if your partner is all talk, and has made no attempt to move toward the goals you set together, then sadly it might be an indication that nothing will ever change. At that point, you can do what they have not been able to do, take the next step yourself and move on.



— Relationship expert Dr. Jane Greer is creator of “Shrink Wrap” – national commentary on what we can learn from celebrity relationships – and host of “Let’s Talk Sex” at Healthylife.net. Her book, “What About Me? Stop Selfishness From Ruining Your Relationship,” is available nationwide.

Metro does not endorse the opinions of the author, or any opinions expressed on its pages.

 
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