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Sick Kids Hospital gets $30M for cancer care

TORONTO - The parents of a boy who lost his battle with cancer have donated $30 million to the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with the goal of helping more children survive the disease.

TORONTO - The parents of a boy who lost his battle with cancer have donated $30 million to the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with the goal of helping more children survive the disease.

The donation, believed to be the single largest private gift to pediatric cancer in North America, will establish the Garron Family Cancer Centre and fund research into childhood cancer.

“We are privileged to support one of the most respected children’s hospitals in the world,” donors Myron and Berna Garron said in a statement Monday. “Our son was treated for cancer at Sick Kids for many years and we will never forget the dedication and level of care he received. We are confident this gift will help create more positive outcomes for cancer patients and their families.”

The donation will support four new senior research chairs and two clinician-scientist positions, various cancer programs at the hospital and the Innovative Therapies Fund, which invests in new treatments for children with cancer.

In 1975, the Garrons' son Michael died at age 13 from synovial sarcoma, a rare soft-tissue cancer. Through the Michael Albert Garron Foundation, the family has previously donated more than $1.3 million to the hospital to fund equipment and research projects to find new treatments for cancer patients.

“The Garron family has had a 40-year relationship with Sick Kids,” said Ted Garrard, president and CEO of the Sick Kids Foundation. “Their past support and this magnificent new donation demonstrate the family’s deep commitment to philanthropy and to making a real difference in pediatric cancer care and research.”

Dr. James Whitlock, chief of hematology and oncology at the hospital, called the impact of such donations "immeasurable."

“This gift helps Sick Kids stay at the forefront of pediatric cancer care and research and will ultimately help children with cancer to live longer, more fulfilling lives.”