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Stores face CO detector shortage

<p>Local store shelves are looking a little bare as Calgarians are buying carbon monoxide detectors in droves as a result of the latest CO poisoning deaths in the city.</p>

Recent poisoning deaths driving up demand for device



robin kuniski/for metro calgary


Adam Lipnicki of Mackenzie Home Depot sits in the spot once occupied by carbon monoxide detectors the store can’t seem to keep on the shelves. Sales of the poison gas sensors have skyrocketed around the city due to recent poisonings, including one that claimed the life of a Calgary business owner last week.






"Some customers are buying six or seven at a time so we can’t keep them on the shelf. Grandparents are buying for their kids and grandkids."






Local store shelves are looking a little bare as Calgarians are buying carbon monoxide detectors in droves as a result of the latest CO poisoning deaths in the city.





In the past month three people have died from carbon monoxide poisoning with the latest victim 61-year-old Don Demorest dying in hospital Thursday night.





Adam Lipnicki, a plumbing department associate at the Mackenzie Home Depot in the city’s southeast, told Metro he has seen sale of carbon monoxide detectors jump “2000 per cent” since Christmas.





“We were sold out last week then we got another shipment of 400 in and they sold out in a day and a half. I only have about eight left right now and I expect they will be sold in about two hours,” he said.





Lipnicki said most customers were concerned about the recent deaths in the city and wanted to protect their homes and their families.





“It’s the news. People are worried because people have died. Some customers are buying six or seven at a time so we can’t keep them on the shelf. Grandparents are buying for their kids and grandkids.”





It’s the same story in the city’s northwest according to Steve Kong, an associate at the Crowfoot Rona which only had a handful available yesterday.





Home Depot customer Craig Clark bought a carbon monoxide detector at the northeast location before returning two hours to buy one with a level input reader but they were sold out.





“Wow, I was just here a couple hours ago and there were half a dozen and now there are none. I’m kicking myself now, I should have bought one earlier,” he said.





Fire Department spokesperson Jeff Budai said while it is unfortunate it took some deaths for people to be more aware of the importance of the detectors, he’s glad people are paying attention.




krista.sylvester@metronews.ca

 
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