Students back program

<p>Emily Canfield already knows what Africentric schooling might look like in Toronto — she took special Africentric Grade 7 math lessons last year as part of a pilot project at Brookview Middle School in the Jane-Finch neighbourhood.</p>

 

Africentric school plan goes before board tonight


 

 

Vince Talotta/Torstar News Service

 

Emily Canfield, left, Daisa Reynolds and Tianna Tomlinson, Grade 8 students from Brookview Middle School in the Jane and Finch area, talk to the media yesterday about an Africentric school pilot program they experienced in Grade 7.



Emily Canfield already knows what Africentric schooling might look like in Toronto — she took special Africentric Grade 7 math lessons last year as part of a pilot project at Brookview Middle School in the Jane-Finch neighbourhood.



She says it was exciting to learn Africa is the cradle of humanity — for all races — where archeologists found the oldest human skeleton; not Europe, as she believed.



Her class practised theories of probability using numbers from the Toronto Star’s 2002 series on racial profiling.



They plotted circle graphs to track the countries of origin of Canada’s black immigrants.



It was all just "so interesting," recalled the 13-year-old yesterday.



If the Toronto District School Board votes tonight to start an alternative school with an African perspective, count her in, Emily says.



Emily is white.



"It’s interesting for anybody to learn this," said the soft-spoken student, who describes her heritage as Irish.




















tested at dozens of schools




  • The Toronto board tested Africentric lessons last year in social studies, math, history, dance and music in 45 classes in Grades 6, 7 and 8 across several dozen schools, in a bid to make the curriculum more relevant and engaging for black students who tend to drop out in higher numbers than children of other backgrounds.


 
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