Students from Nellie McClung School weren’t afraid to get their hands dirty to exhibit how worms can reduce waste for their school.

 

 

In the 10 years students have been allowed at the Mayor’s Environment Expo, 40,000 youth have been educated about environmental issues through projects and presentations.

 


However, lately the tables have turned and children, like those from Nellie McClung, are teaching adults different methods to safeguard the new generation’s future.



“The barrier is not them, it’s adults — it’s us,” said Deputy Mayor Brian Pincott after hearing from students who want to reduce idling.

Nellie McClung’s green club showed visitors how it uses vermicomposters, bins full of worms, to reduce the school’s garbage output.


“It’s just one little thing, but it really helps the environment,” said Alex Vanderput, 11.

Teacher Karen Davis, who runs the club, said students came up with the idea, built the composters, put them in the school cafeteria and finally educated their classmates through presentations — cutting organic waste roughly in half.


“It shows we are getting our message through. It’s working and we’re making a difference, said Alexa Calkhoven, 11.

Davis, who has taught for 17 years, said the new generation of young kids is more environmentally conscious than ever before.


“They’re way beyond reduce, reuse, recycle. They’re coming up with new R’s! Like refuse.”

The expo runs until June 3 in the city hall atrium.