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Students rewarded for their good deeds

They’ve founded organizations to raise money for those impacted by genocide, supplied impoverished countries with school supplies and started programs to encourage girls to participate in sports — all before reaching the age of majority.

They’ve founded organizations to raise money for those impacted by genocide, supplied impoverished countries with school supplies and started programs to encourage girls to participate in sports — all before reaching the age of majority.

Twenty Canadian students who have made a positive impact received a TD scholarship for Community Leadership at the Chateau Laurier Thursday.

In its 15th year, the awards provided the students each with a scholarship worth up to $70,000 to cover post-secondary tuition and living expenses.

“Strong community involvement has enriched my life so much already,” said winner Toluwani Falaye of Calgary. Falaye created the Youth Initiative Leadership Program to equip young women with leadership skills to help them be successful.

To make a dream a reality, you have to have the right tools, said past recipient Craig Kielburger, founder of Free the Children and co-founder of the Me to We campaign. Ottawa’s Shawn MacDonell, the founder of Creativision, is also a past winner.

Winners come from across Canada and include Bronté Robinson-Pike of Mill Bay, B.C., who founded a program to bring awareness to the issues of bullying and discrimination and Patrick Quinton Brown, of Whitby, who founded Operation Humanity, a web-based network of secondary school social justice and peace groups across Ontario.

 
 
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