Home
 
Choose Your City
Change City

Trying to take a bite out of dog attacks

<p>Anyone who thinks a dog chasing a postal worker is a caricature need only speak to Donna McIntosh.</p>




Kristen Thompson/metro Vancouver


Letter carrier Donna McIntosh yesterday shows a photograph of her leg after a dog attacked her last month.





“I used to trust him, but now when I have to go to the door my heart rate goes up. I think dogs are probably the scariest part (of the job). That and the rain in Vancouver.”




Anyone who thinks a dog chasing a postal worker is a caricature need only speak to Donna McIntosh.





The 28-year Canada Post veteran was attacked last month by a familiar dog when approaching its owner’s door with a package.





The small, white dog took a bite out of her thigh, leaving her with a deep scar and a fear of dogs.





“I used to trust him, but now when I have to go to the door my heart rate goes up,” she said. “I think dogs are probably the scariest part (of the job). That and the rain in Vancouver.”





McIntosh was joined by postal employees and dog experts at a safety awareness forum in Delta yesterday, to discuss letter carrier safety.





Dog-related injuries have doubled in British Columbia this year compared to last, according to William Lynd, Workplace Health and Safety Officer for Canada Post.





Stanley Koren, a professor of psychology at the University of B.C. and a dog expert, said any dog has the potential to bite, and that the smaller dogs cause the most problems.





He said owners should train their dogs not to bark when people come on the property and never leave them alone in the yard.















attacks



  • In June and July there were 19 reported incidents compared to eight last year. This August a carrier has been involved in a dog incident every working day.



  • Carriers are given training on how to approach animals, how to read dog behaviour, and what to do if one appears aggressive.



 
Consider AlsoFurther Articles