U of A celebrates centennial

<p>The Canadian flag, commercial satellite communications and Chatelaine magazine all have something in common — they are achievements made by University of Alberta graduates.</p>

 

100th birthday celebrations kick off yesterday


 

 

Ben Lemphers/for metro edmonton

 

Aboriginal a cappella group, Asani, performs Canada’s national anthem to open the University of Alberta’s centenary address yesterday at the university’s Convocation Hall.





The Canadian flag, commercial satellite communications and Chatelaine magazine all have something in common — they are achievements made by University of Alberta graduates.



These milestones — among hundreds of others in science, business and technology — will be recognized all year long as officials at the university kicked off a year’s worth of celebrations for the school’s 100th anniversary yesterday.



"The University of Alberta has so very much to be proud of," spoke U of A President Dr. Indira Samarasekera during her centenary address yesterday.



"And in this, our 100th year, we are entitled — yes entitled — to toot our own horns a bit and demand a nod from the world."



Former Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick George Stanley, a U of A graduate, designed Canada’s flag.



Joseph Charyk, a 1942 U of A grad, developed the INTELSAT satellite communications system, which serves more than 160 countries.



Doris Anderson, who graduated from the U of A in 1945, founded the popular women’s magazine.



The yearlong celebration will include question-and-answer sessions with Canada’s six living former prime ministers, including Jean Chrétien Feb. 7, Joe Clark March 12 and Kim Campbell May 5.



Future dates will be planned for Brian Mulroney, John Turner, Paul Martin and current Prime Minister Stephen Harper.



During each visit at the university’s Prime Ministers Conversation Series, leaders will reflect on some of the pressing issues they faced while in office, say organizers.



A celebration of Arctic culture in Canada and a festival of arts and ideas will also mark the university’s centennial celebrations this year with its upcoming Canadian Arctic Summit in May and its Festival of Ideas in November, according to U of A officials.



A homecoming that is expected to attract over 270,000 alumni is also being planned for the university this September.




















large draw




  • U of A’s president, above, spoke to over 200 alumni and professors at the school’s Convocation Hall yesterday.


 
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