Not only will visitors to Ontario House be able to sample some of that province’s finest craft brews, they’ll also be able to control the lights at the CN Tower, Parliament and Niagara Falls — with their minds.

The spacious pavilion, one of six at the Concord Place community celebration zone, features a number of cool demonstrations, including a 4-D movie and a 3-D game that doesn’t require 3-D glasses.

Up against a wall, concealed by some wooden lattices, are a trio of Clockwork Orange-esque chairs with headsets that monitor brain waves.

Varying your state of mind allows a person to change vibrations in the chair, the music in the speakers and — coolest of all — lights at those three iconic Canadian landmarks.

Ontario House, along with the Maison du Quebec and the Saskatchewan Pavilion, are part of a free family entertainment zone located east of B.C. Place along False Creek.

It also houses the massive Molson Canadian Hockey House, a modest Right To Play tent and an extremely modest — roughly 215 square feet — modular housing display by B.C. Housing.

The Maison du Quebec, a giant white cube with no roof, promises food, music, dancing and “joie de vivre.”

During a tour yesterday, chefs offered up tourtiere, maple cotton candy and maple taffy.

Saskatchewan Pavilion has an entertainment hall that features Sas­katchewan musicians, barbecue bison burgers and Saskatoon-berry pies. It also has a six-storey air-supported dome.

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