Wipe out violence against women

<p>Lesley Parrott, the mother of a Toronto girl who was violently murdered in 1986, called on Ontario’s premier to "engage the best brains with the most open minds and hearts" to come up with a long-term solution to eradicate violence against women.</p>

 



 

 

Paul Chiasson/cp

 

A woman is lost in her thoughts during a ceremony yesterday in Montreal to mark the 18th anniversary of the Polytechnique massacre in which 14 women were killed.





Lesley Parrott, the mother of a Toronto girl who was violently murdered in 1986, called on Ontario’s premier to "engage the best brains with the most open minds and hearts" to come up with a long-term solution to eradicate violence against women.



She made her remarks during an emotional and tearful candlelight ceremony at Women’s College Hospital yesterday in honour of the 14 young women murdered at L’École Polytechnique de Montréal by a gunman in 1989.



The ceremony was one of many scheduled across the country on the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. Flags on federal buildings were lowered to half-mast.



At Women’s College Hospital, 14 red roses were placed in a vase as the names of the murdered women were read aloud. "One thing I know is that the lives and deaths of those 14 young women, although far too short when gunned down in their prime, have made a difference," Parrott told the crowd, which included Premier Dalton McGuinty and Ontario Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues, Deb Matthews.




















per week




  • Across Canada, one to two women are murdered every week on average, Lesley Parrott said.