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Kennel renovation could spare the lives of sick and unwanted dogs

The PSCPA will take in 50 dogs while ACCT Philly undergoes repair work.

Philadelphia’s Animal Care & Control Team had a problem, but that might be good news for sick and unadoptable dogs that could face euthanization at the shelter.

The shelter, known as ACCT Philly, was planning to replace its heating and ventilation system. But during that period, it would not be able to house 50 of its 100 dogs.

To the rescue came its neighbor, the Philadelphia SPCA, which has agreed to provide kennel space for the required two months of work.

ACCT Philly, which operates on a city contract to provide animal control services, does euthanize sick or unadoptable animals. ACCT Philly is required to accept all animals or find alternate placement. An estimated 23,000 animals pass through its shelter a year.

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The PSPCA, a donor-funded nonprofit dedicated to preventing animal cruelty, is considered a “no-kill” shelter.

So while ACCT Philly is making do with the smaller facility, the PSPCA will help safely shelter some of the extra pups.

“When ACCT Philly approached us asking for assistance during this time of need, we wanted to help in any way possible,” said Julie Klim, PSPCA CEO. “We regularly pull dogs from ACCT Philly, including those in need of medical assistance.”

ACCT Philly and the PSCPA are the two biggest animal shelters in the city.

When repairs are completed, it is unlikely any of the dogs will be returned to ACCT Philly, meaning they would not be euthanized if no one adopts them.

“The goal of the partnership is to minimize euthanasia, take the pressure off as ACCT Philly undergoes renovations, and ultimately to save more lives in the city of Philadelphia,” the organizations said in a joint statement.

While renovations are underway, people who would otherwise bring stray or lost dogs to ACCT Philly should now bring them to the PSPCA.

“It’s a good step forward that our organizations can work forward hand-in-hand for the betterment of Philadelphia,” said ACCT Philly spokeswoman Ame Dorminy. “They don’t have to help us, but they want to.”

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