President Trump to Meet with NATO
President Donald Trump. Photo: Getty Images

More Americans support impeaching President Donald Trump than don’t, a new poll shows.

 

Almost half of Americans — 48 percent — want to impeach Trump while 41 percent remain opposed, a Public Policy Polling survey shows. Just 43 percent of voters believe Trump will finish a full term in office.

 

The poll, funded by a Democratic polling agency, suggested voters are having buyer’s remorse about the outcome of the 2016 presidential election — 49 percent said they wish Hillary Clinton was in the White House instead of Trump, compared to 41 percent who disagree with that sentiment.

 

The Trump administration has weathered more than its share of controversies after just four months in office. Americans are not happy with Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey or reports that Trump divulged highly classified intelligence to Russian officials, and it’s all beginning to weigh on the president’s credibility.

 

Following conflicting information from the White House following Comey’s firing last week, Trump tweeted it was unreasonable to expect his press staff to always tell the truth, but 77 percent of voters say they do expect the president's press secretaries to tell the truth all the time, compared to only 14 percent who say that isn't their expectation.

At this point, a majority of Americans — 51 percent — outright say they think Trump is a liar, and just 38 percent of voters said they consider Trump to be honest.

Trump’s refusal to release his tax returns is causing a major trust issue for voters — 62 percent think he needs to release them while just 29 percent believe it’s not necessary.

Healthcare has been another obstacle to Trump’s and Republicans' favorability. Just 25 percent of Americans support the American Health Care Act, while 52 percent are opposed.

“House Republicans passed a healthcare bill that doesn’t even have majority support within their own party,” Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling, said in a statement. “The main thing the bill seems to have done is get Democrats even more fired up for 2018 than they were already.”

Trump has suffered from consistently low approval ratings since taking office, never edging much above 40 percent, according to Gallup. Trump has the lowest approval of any new president since 1953.

Considering the hurdles the Trump administration has had to leap over during its first four months at the helm, it might not be surprising that just 34 percent think he has fulfilled his campaign promise to “Make America Great Again.”