Like it or not, Andre Iguodala is finally All-Star

When Andre Iguodala was named to his first career All-Star game, theSixers were 18-8. Since then, they’ve dropped six of eight and areriding a five-game losing streak.

When Andre Iguodala was named to his first career All-Star game, the Sixers were 18-8. Since then, they’ve dropped six of eight and are riding a five-game losing streak.

 

It’s almost ironic the Sixers are stumbling so badly into the All-Star break. After all, the team’s early success is the major reason why Iguodala was honored as an All-Star reserve — and he knows it.

 

“I think winning is the most important thing,” Iguodala said earlier this month. “As long as we continue to win, I am happy. I think Detroit, the year they went to the Finals the first time, they had no All-Stars.”

 

Iguodala’s wayward jumper, miserable free-throw shooting and $80 million contract means he’s often still a whipping boy for the city’s fans. The eighth-year Sixer has the lowest scoring average (12.4 points per game) among the 24 All-Stars.

 

“I hope at some point in time our fans will really embrace ’Dre,” coach Doug Collins said. “That would be the greatest gift they could give me, is to embrace him.”

Sixers fans may never be on board with Iguodala, but after this weekend the likely Olympian will add another line to his growing résumé: NBA All-Star.

Is Turner regressing?

Evan Turner was selected by the NBA’s assistant coaches to participate in Friday night’s Rising Stars

Challenge. The problem for the Sixers is that Turner has been declining rather than rising of late.

That supposedly revamped jumper has been off, as last year’s No. 2 overall pick is shooting just 35.3 percent over his last 13 games. That’s led to a meager 20.5 minutes per game in February. Turner has the look of a long-term bench player.

 
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