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Mark Teixeira done for 2013 season

Mark Teixeira done for 2013 season

Mark Teixeira will need surgery on his wrist and is done for the year. Credit: Getty Images Mark Teixeira will need surgery on his wrist and is done for the year.
Credit: Getty Images

Mark Teixeira estimates before last week, he had 12 cortisone shots that had been successful. When the 13th did not have the same impact on his inflamed right wrist, he knew right there and then that his season was likely over.

“The final point was this past Sunday when, after a week, the cortisone shot didn’t work,” Teixeira said. “I usually respond very well to cortisone shots. I’ve had a dozen in my career, and I’ve always responded pretty well. It didn’t work and I wasn’t getting any better. So I knew it was going to be bad news.

“When he was in his fourth and fifth day and he really wasn’t having any relief and still having pain, there was some concern of mine,” manager Joe Girardi said. “That’s why he was evaluated again.”


The Yankees confirmed that fact Wednesday afternoon by issuing the following update:

“After a recent MRI with dye contrast was performed on Mark Teixeira’s right wrist, New York Yankees Team Physician, Dr. Christopher Ahmad, along with Dr. Melvin Rosenwasser and two other New York-based hand specialists (Dr. Michelle Carlson from the Hospital for Special Surgery and Dr. Keith Raskin from NYU) confirmed that the sheath has not adequately healed. Surgery has been recommended to repair the tear on the tendon sheath of his wrist. There is not a date set for the surgery though it will be soon and it will likely happen in New York. The estimated rehab time is four to five months and Teixeira said that because it is not a degenerative condition his wrist should be 100 percent in six months.

Teixeira’s return lasted just 15 games and he looked promising in his first week back, hitting three home runs. Then he felt something and he pulled himself out of a game in Anaheim in the early innings on June 15.

“It’s tough to exactly tell (how it happened)," Teixeira said. “It could have been one check swing, one bad swing. It could have been one violent swing that finally did it again. Or, it could have just been the constant wear. You guys know, baseball players, we swing the bat really hard. It’s very violent swing, and if your wrist is a little bit not right, or a little bit weak, these things happen.”

 
 
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