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Playing the Field: A-Rod's mansion up for sale

Got $38 million burning a hole in your pocket?

Got $38 million burning a hole in your pocket? Need a new, luxury Miami beach house? Well have I got the deal for you.

Yankees third baseman/DL inhabitant Alex Rodriguez is putting his Miami mansion on the market for a cool $38 million. And he's looking to make a tidy $14 million profit. Considering he won't be making any money after his current $275 million contract expires, he apparently needs some alternative income.

He bought the nine-bedroom and 11-bathroom house just two years ago. According to the listing it has two docks (for both your yachts presumably), a movie theater and even an indoor batting cage, which I would presume has hardly been used.

No word on if it comes with a painting of A-Rod as a centaur.

Usain Bolt is faster than you

We have a growing phenomenon among football players. They all watched the Olympics and they are all incredibly unimpressed with Usain Bolt.

Last week we got Titans running back Chris Johnson saying he could beat Bolt in a 40-yard dash. And then yesterday we got Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson saying essentially the same thing.

My response: No. No, you could not.

I've never understood the phenomenon of people thinking they are better athletes than professionals at their discipline, even fellow world-class athletes. There is no question both Robinson and Johnson are fast football players. But you aren't sprinters. Bolt trains everyday to run very, very fast. You train everyday to be a good football player. (By the way, both guys could stand to work a little more on that as of late.)

It probably has something to do with the confidence and swagger you need to be a professional athlete. I'm sure Bolt would say he could play in the NFL if he wanted to. He can't. U.S. sprinter Justin Gatlin tried during his drug suspension stint and failed miserably.

The prevailing thought among both Johnson and Robinson is that Bolt isn't a good starter. He's not ... for a sprinter. That still means he's much better than every non-professional sprinter.

But in the interest of fairness, here's a look at Johnson's 4.24-second 40 from the NFL Combine back in 2008. It is the fastest electronic-timed dash ever. (That is a fairly recent addition. Deion Sanders for instance reportedly ran faster.)



Follow Metro New York Sports Editor Mark Osborne on Twitter @MetroNYSports. He could totally beat Usain Bolt in a 40-yard dash. Why not? All the cool kids are saying it.

 
 
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