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Report: Alex Rodriguez leaked names in Biogenesis scandal

CBS reported people in Rodriguez's "inner circle" leaked documents implicating Ryan Braun and Francisco Cervelli as receiving performance-enhancing drugs.

Alex Rodriguez is not ingratiating himself to the rest of the league. Credit: Getty Images Alex Rodriguez is not ingratiating himself to the rest of the league.
Credit: Getty Images

As if Alex Rodriguez wasn't disliked enough in MLB, now word comes he and his associates leaked names of players who visited the Biogenesis clinic in Miami.

CBS's "60 Minutes" reported Friday that people in Rodriguez's "inner circle" leaked documents to the media implicating Brewers slugger Ryan Braun and teammate Francisco Cervelli as receiving performance-enhancing drugs from Biogenesis.

Rodriguez's lawyers denied the report.

"These allegations are untrue and are another attempt to harm Alex, this time by driving a wedge between him and other players in the league," David Cornwell, Rodriguez's lead attorney, said in a statement. "While Alex focuses on baseball and repeatedly states that he is going to respect the appeal process, the drumbeat of false allegations continues. These improper and viciously false leaks will not alter the fact that MLB exceeded its authority under the JDA [Joint Drug Agreement] and the 211 game [suspension] will not stand."

When the Miami New Times broke the story that the Biogenesis clinic and its owner Anthony Bosch were providing drugs to athletes, including Rodriguez, neither Braun or Cervelli were mentioned. CBS reports Rodriguez's associates leaked the information that they had obtained PEDs through the clinic days later. Braun and Cervelli were named in an article by Yahoo! Sports.

While both Braun and Cervelli accepted suspensions from MLB for their relationship with Biogenesis, Rodriguez is currently appealing a 211-game ban. He continues to play during the appeal.

From the start of the case, MLB said Rodriguez deserved the heavier suspension due to "attempting to cover up his violations of the program by engaging in a course of conduct intended to obstruct and frustrate the Office of the Commissioner’s investigation."

The leaking of information, should it be proven to have occurred, would be in violation of the JDA.

Follow Metro New York Sports Editor Mark Osborne on Twitter @MetroNYSports.

 
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