Andy Grammer
Andy Grammer will join Leslie Odom Jr. and Melissa Etheridge on July 4. Photo by Nathan Congleton / NBC

Andy Grammer, the multi-platinum hit maker behind "Honey, I'm Good" and "Fresh Eyes," brings his feel-good pop sounds to Boston for this year's Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular.

 

The 33-year-old singer-songwriter will rock out with "Hamilton" star Leslie Odom Jr. and music icon Melissa Etheridge as they celebrate Independence Day with the Boston Pops orchestra. While Grammer is excited for his first July 4 performance, he's even more pumped to make his return to the Hub, one of his favorite music cities.

 

"All music cities are not created equal. I’ve probably been to Boston like 20 times. It really is one of my favorite places to play," Grammer says. "I feel in any radio or magazine interview, everyone goes, ‘It’s my favorite place!’ But Boston is legitimately one of my favorite spots.”

 

Although the California-born crooner has a lot on his plate between his myriad of performances and working on his third studio album, Grammer is about to suffer even more sleep deprivation when his wife and fellow musician Aijia gives birth to a baby girl later this year. The dad-to-be believes impending fatherhood has already changed his life for the better.

 

"I’m 33, so to have something so brand new about life – like completely have no idea about how any of it’s going to go – that’s really exciting," he says. "I didn’t grow up with very many little girls around me, so I’m taking that in. It’s amazing. It’s like a different world and this little girl hasn’t even shown up yet."

 

Considering that the couple has such an affinity for music, expect them to pass on their love of the artform to their daughter. Grammer has a few ideas on what classic tunes parents should show their kids.

"I think you need a solid Billy Joel [song] somewhere,” he says. "'And So It Goes' is really good. I’d probably go with a Paul Simon one since it feels good, like 'You Can Call Me Al.'"

Should his soon-to-be-born baby girl find her way into the music business when she grows up, don't be surprise if she carries some of her dad's artistic values with her. Grammer reveals that, when he writes songs, it's all about "chasing the laws of life," comparing his approach to that of scientist.

"Isaac Newton wrote out what gravity was, a law of the universe," Grammer says. "Songs I get excited about touch on some law about being alive, whether it’s going through a break-up, being inspired to move out to L.A., something with your dad or mom that you’ve got to work through. If you catch a law of the universe and you write it down, you’ve got a great song.”