Marlon Wayans White Chicks 2
Marlon Wayans performs at the Chevalier Theatre this weekend. Photo by Getty Images

Audiences have been clamoring for a "White Chicks 2" ever since the original comedy became a surprise box office success in 2004.

 

Marlon Wayans, who starred in the film opposite his brother Shawn, is apparently just as excited about a possible sequel as the fans. The actor and comedian hinted in a recent interview on MTV's "TRL" that there's been "some rumblings happening," and he's had a few discussions with his brothers about doing a follow-up film.

 

Ahead of his show in the Boston area this weekend, Wayans reiterated his interest in a "White Chicks 2" during a chat with Metro.

 

"I think that’ll be awesome if it happens," says Wayans. "I don’t control that stuff, man. If it does happen, I’m willing to make it happen."

 

"It’s all about the business of things," he adds, noting that they have to take care of budgets and other behind the scenes issues before making a sequel happen. "Once we do that, I’m all in."

For now, Wayans is concentrating on his sitcom "Marlon," which is set to return for season two on NBC in June, as well as his stand-up work. Although the comic has been making people laugh for decades, Wayans didn't take the plunge into the world of comedy specials until this past February with the release of "Woke-ish" on Netflix.

Although many people have brought up the idea of doing a special to Wayans over the years, he didn't want to "rush out there and do it," preferring to wait until he "had something to say" and "a point of view on things that are happening."

Wayans finally felt ready leading up to "Woke-ish," which tackles everything from his views on parenting to Donald Trump. While he feels like the current climate and political correctness have made it a bit harder for comics to do what they do, Wayans welcomes the challenge of finding the funny during such divisive times.

"I definitely think it makes it harder," he says. "At the same time, obstacles are good."

"Laughter is bonding," Wayans adds. "Everybody has their gift, their purpose, and mine is to make people smile to the best of my abilities. Even if you fail at doing it, it’s a lot of fun trying."

Looking at the entertainment landscape as a whole, Wayans is happy to see how much progress has been made by African American performers and entertainers of color. In particular, the 45-year-old star—who almost played Robin opposite Michael Keaton's Batman back in the day—praises the success of "Black Panther" and its ability to showcase themes that resonate with the real world.

Wayans acknowledges that there's still a ways to go, but hopes that black creators will continue to "kick down doors" by helming their own projects.

"It’s coming, little by little. Baby steps man," Wayans says. "Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither will equality."

If you go:

May 19, 7 p.m., Chevalier Theatre, 30 Forest St., Medford, $27+, chevaliertheatre.com

Marlon wayans White Chicks 2