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FDA okay of ‘female Viagra’ could come today amid safety criticism

Will potential FDA okay of Flibanserin -- ‘Viagra for women’ -- break the Internet?

Today could be the day the gals get their version of the little blue pill. Natch, it’ll be pink.

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Yep. Multiple reports Tuesday said it could be D-Day for Flibanserin -- the female version of Viagra that is nothing like Pfizer’s blockbuster erectile dysfunction drug in more ways than one.

UPDATE: FDA approves "female Viagra."

There’ll be no rush of blood to female private parts, the way Viagra works.

Instead, Sprout Pharmaceuticals’ drug works on the brain, increasing female sexual desire.

It's the way the drug works that has split health experts.

Emily Wheeler, a doctoral candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Massachusetts, with other experts, has written that “female Viagra is a failed me-too antidepressant.”

RELATED:Will theFierarevolutionize women's sex lives?

The piece on the alternative psychiatric care website “ Mad in America ” takes on Sprout’s “ingenious marketing campaign” called “ Even the Score,” claiming that men have all types of little helper drugs and women had none.

"We firmly believe that equitable access to health care should be a fundamental right, regardless of whether you are a man or a woman. But when it comes to sexual health – and, in particular, sexual dysfunction – that's just not the case," the members wrote to the FDA in March.

The campaign has gotten all sorts of women’s groups to sign on, including the National Organization for Women.

An investigation by Think Progress Video dove deep into Sprout’s marketing efforts.

The FDA has previously rejected “female viagra” twice. This new go-round included a study of the drug’s interaction with alcohol and found that dizziness and drowsiness were among the side-effects.

In July, 200 doctors sent letters to the FDA saying flibanserin is little better than a placebo.

"Approving flibanserin will not only unleash an unsafe drug onto the U.S. market, but will send a message to industry that pressuring the FDA through public relations campaigns can get a drug approved," wrote Adriane Fugh-Berman, head of a group called PharmedOut.

John A. Oswald is editor-at-large at Metro and can be found on Twitter@nyc_oz.
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