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What you need to know about the coronavirus right now - Metro US

What you need to know about the coronavirus right now

Children go through COVID-19 checks before summer camp

(Reuters) – Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus right now:

Approval for Trump’s virus response sinks

American approval of President Donald Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic has dropped to the lowest recorded level, the latest Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll shows, as new COVID-19 cases surged.

The poll shows that 37% of Americans approved of the way Trump has responded to the pandemic, the lowest since Reuters/Ipsos started asking the question at the beginning of March. Fifty-eight percent said they disapproved.

Trump has been slow to publicly acknowledge the severity of the coronavirus outbreak, which has killed more than 120,000 Americans so far, and he has pushed states to reopen before some experts said it was safe to do so.

In his first post-pandemic rally, held in Oklahoma on Saturday, the president told thousands of supporters that testing was a “double-edged sword” and that he asked health officials to slow down testing in response to the public’s concern for the growing number of cases.

Second-wave fears in Australia

Australia’s second most populous state on Wednesday said a man in his 80s died overnight from the coronavirus, the country’s first death from the virus in more than a month, as concerns about a second wave of infections saw thousands queue for COVID-19 tests and supermarkets impose new restrictions.

Authorities in Victoria, which has become the virus hotspot in Australia, have been trying to contain the spread of the virus in half a dozen suburbs in the largest city of Melbourne hit by a spike in cases. It is believed the surge in new cases has been caused by family get-togethers attended by people with mild symptoms.

Australia has so far escaped a high number of casualties from the new coronavirus, with just over 7,500 infections and 103 deaths.

Fish off the menu in China

China’s appetite for salmon and other seafood has crashed this month, after a resurgence in coronavirus infections in Beijing was traced to chopping boards for imported salmon in a wholesale food market in the capital.

Exporters all the way to Europe are feeling the pinch as the virus scare prompts supermarkets and e-commerce players such as Taobao, JD.com and Meituan in China, the world’s top consumer of frozen and fresh seafood, to slash salmon sales.

Barron Qin, owner of a Beijing fish hotpot restaurant called Yufu Yuzai, said customers had been lining up everyday but now the restaurant was half empty despite not serving salmon.

“My hope is like a soap bubble, burst by the new round of the outbreak,” he said.

‘Light at end of tunnel’ in Germany

German business morale posted its strongest rise in June since records began and Europe’s largest economy should return to growth in the third quarter after the coronavirus pandemic hammered output in the spring, the Ifo institute said.

“Companies’ assessments of their current situation were somewhat better. Moreover, their expectations leaped higher. German business sees light at the end of the tunnel,” Ifo President Clemens Fuest said.

A robust healthcare system and widespread testing has helped Germany record fewer fatalities linked to COVID-19 than many other European countries. Even so, Europe’s largest economy is facing its worst recession since World War Two.

No name, no pint (and no writhing)

Drinkers in England’s pubs will have to give their name before they order a pint, and there will be no live acts or standing at the bar, the government said in advice for re-opening the sector next month.

Pubs, restaurants and hairdressers will have to keep a record of customers for 21 days to assist the state health service’s test and trace operation, which aims to identify and contain any local flare ups of COVID-19 and stop a second wave of infections.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he was keen to enjoy a visit to the pub and urged people to go out and enjoy their new freedom to socialise next month, but cautioned that they would still need to act responsibly.

“We can’t have, you know, great sort of writhing scenes in the beer gardens when the virus could be passed on.”

(For Reuters’ suite of interactive graphics on the coronavirus, click https://tmsnrt.rs/2GVwIyw)

(Compiled by Linda Noakes; Editing by Alex Richardson)

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