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Your guide to the New York midterm elections - Metro US

Your guide to the New York midterm elections

From what’s at stake to when and where to vote, here’s everything you need to know about Tuesday’s crucial midterm elections.
Many governorships, all 435 House of Representatives seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats across the nation will be on the ballot for the 2018 midterm elections on Nov. 6, and New York state is no different. (iStock)

The midterm elections are Tuesday, and with Republicans’ majority in Congress possibly at stake — and voter turnout seeing an uptick in the primaries — Nov. 6 could be one of the most important days in U.S. history.

Many governorships, all 435 House of Representatives seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats across the nation will be on the ballot Nov. 6, and New York state is no different.

Here’s everything you need to know about the 2018 midterm elections in New York.

When to vote in the midterm elections

The New York midterm elections are Tuesday, Nov. 6. Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Where to vote in the midterm elections

You can only vote at your designated polling station, which you can find at vote.nyc.us or by looking on your voter registration card.

How to vote in the midterm elections

Voters in Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx will see a two-page ballot at the polls, the city’s Board of Elections said. It is double-sided, so be sure to turn it over to mark your votes. It will need to be separated at the fold before being inserted into the scanner to be tallied.

Key races in the New York midterm elections

If political newcomer Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez defeats her Republican challenger Anthony Pappas during the midterm elections, she’ll be the youngest woman elected to Congress. (Getty)

While nearly every elected office is up for reelection in the 2018 midterms, the key races include:

Governor: Two-term incumbent Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo faces Republican Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro.

Lieutenant Governor: Incumbent Democrat Kathy Hochul is challenged by Republican Julie Killian, former deputy mayor of Rye, New York.

Attorney General: Republican Manhattan lawyer Keith Wofford is running against Democratic New York City Public Advocate Letitia James.

U.S. Senate: Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is challenged by investment banker Chele Farley, finance chair of the state Republican Party.

State Senate: Every seat is up for reelection, and with many former members of the Independent Democratic Conference defeated by newcomers in the primary, these results are sure to be interesting. 

House of Representatives: While all 27 seats are on the ballot, eyes have been on Democratic-Socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who defeated 14-year incumbent Joe Crowley in the primary. If she defeats Republican St. John’s economics and finance professor Anthony Pappas on Tuesday as many expect, Ocasio-Cortez will be the youngest woman elected to Congress.

To find a full run down of the New York midterm elections ballot, visit ballotpedia.org.

Midterm elections aftermath

To help make sense of Tuesday’s results, sociologist, activist and author Frances Fox Piven will discuss the results, consequences and meaning of the midterm elections on Monday, Nov. 12 at SVA. The event is free and open to the public, but you will need to RSVP at sva.edu.

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